Loading…
Thursday, October 6 • 11:00 - 12:30
Rights

Sign up or log in to save this to your schedule and see who's attending!

Imagining and Encoding Rights on the Internet: Challenges and Opportunities
Lex Gill (1), Dennis Redeker (2)
1: Berkman Klein Center for Internet & Society (Affiliate), McGill University Faculty of Law, Canada; 2: Berkman Klein Center for Internet & Society (Affiliate), Jacobs University Bremen; University of Bremen

This roundtable session will explore the ecosystem of political rights, governance norms, and limitations on power that have been imagined for the digital age. Session organizers include Dennis Redeker and Lex Gill, affiliates to the Berkman Center for Internet and Society and co-authors of the Berkman working paper entitled “Toward Digital Constitutionalism? Mapping Attempts to Craft an Internet Bill of Rights” (2015). Their research has examined thirty compelling attempts to codify human rights in the digital sphere, from political manifestos of the mid-1990s to ambitious modern initiatives like Brazil’s Marco Civil. The session will begin with a brief overview that visualizes their findings, then opens the floor for participants to move freely between four central themes in small groups:
1. Actors and sites of intervention: Who are the key drivers behind these processes, and who should they be? At what political level should digital rights be entrenched?
2. Impact of technical infrastructure: How do the technical realities of the Internet shape the boundaries of possibility for digital “rights” such as network access, the right to be forgotten, or the right to use encryption?
3. Substantive rights: In an ideal “Bill of Rights” for the Internet, what principles should be included—or excluded?
4. Risks and limitations: what might we risk in attempting to craft such a document? For example, might these initiatives run the risk of a kind of “digital colonialism,” or promote fragmentation?
This session presents a unique lens to examine the AoIR 2016 conference themes of coordination, rule-making and rule-breaking in the digital sphere. Materials will be provided to encourage creative engagement with each theme, and discussion will be followed by a collective report-back that synthesizes key observations. No specialized knowledge of Internet governance, legal theory or international law is necessary: participants from all disciplines are encouraged to contribute.

Moderators
LG

Lex Gill

Berkman Klein Center for Internet & Society (Affiliate), McGill University Faculty of Law, Canada

Speakers
DR

Dennis Redeker

Berkman Klein Center for Internet & Society (Affiliate), Jacobs University Bremen; University of Bremen


Thursday October 6, 2016 11:00 - 12:30
HU 1.204 Humboldt University of Berlin Dorotheenstr. 24

Attendees (8)